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Give Me Everything

Peter Katevatis - Apr 17, 2015
We have all been there at some point… you are given everything you want, you do whatever you like, and you don’t have a care in the world… and then you wake up. Reality for most of us is that must work hard for what you get.  There is sacrifice, h

We have all been there at some point… you are given everything you want, you do whatever you like, and you don’t have a care in the world… and then you wake up.

 

Reality for most of us is that must work hard for what you get.  There is sacrifice, hard work, failure, perseverance and (hopefully) success.  There is a growing portion of the population which I call the ME Generation that live their lives expecting all the rights, freedoms and entitlements of our society, but accept too few responsibilities.  They tend to be 15-25 years old and have never had a real job.  They have mostly had everything they need and can thank their parents for providing a safe environment with everything they want and desire.

 

ME Generation tantrum

 

This entitlement generation will face a harsh reality and it will be interesting to see how they will handle it.  You can't really fault the kids in this, because they ask and then receive. How awesome is that? Would you give that up? I wouldn't.  Now the parents on the other hand, are empowering this sense of entitlement with their behaviour.  Kids are generally born with a good heart (let’s leave Baby Hades out of this), but they become a little more spoiled each time their wishes are fulfilled without having to earn what they want.   Now don't get me wrong, I do not believe your kids should go without life’s essentials, but earning their extra “stuff” is a good lesson.  It is never too early to start teaching your kids about the value of a dollar, but it can be too late.

 

Isn't good parenting about teaching your kids accountability and responsibility? How you get there is up to you, but here are few things I've learned along the way with my kids.

  • Always be consistent – what is bad today is bad tomorrow
  • Show them the price tags – how else can they learn value?
  • Involve them in decisions:
    • Which shoes should we buy for you?
    • What shall we have for dinner?
    • Which ride should we go on next?

 

There are clearly limits to how far you want to get your children involved with the decisions but the benefits will be two-fold.  Most importantly, they will understand the path it take to make everyday decisions.  The importance of this can often be lost in today’s ME generation.  The secondary benefit is that since they had some say in the decision (chicken for dinner), they cannot complain when the plate is put in front of them.

 

In today’s wired world we need more things that let us spend time with our kids.  Menial everyday tasks are part of life and life is better when it is shared.

 

Investing discipline can also be that simple but let’s save that for another day.